Criminal justice

The majority of prisoners have mental health problems, often two or more at the same time. Imprisonment doesn't seem to reduce re-offending and it costs a great deal. We're finding more ways to fix this by developing liaison and diversion services, advocating community sentences, improving youth justice and unlocking secure care.

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It sets out what prisoners themselves say they need to improve their mental health: 'someone to talk to', 'something to do' during the day and practical help to plan for what they will do after they are released.
Publication
Matthew Scott shares his role in raising awareness of mental health issues as a Police and Crime Commissioner
Blog
Prison deaths through suicide have risen at an alarming rate. We're working to prevent future tragic losses of life.
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Jenny Talbot OBE reflects on the needs of women in the criminal justice system, and the role of local authorities in supporting them.
Blog
Information about a network for practitioners and managers of Liaison & Diversion services across London
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Children who end up in custody have multiple needs, many of which go unrecognised and unmet. We've developed a new approach to fix this.
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Secure mental health services treat people with severe mental health problems who pose a risk to the public. But the services are subject to long delays and patients getting stuck.
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Reoffending costs the economy somewhere in the region of £11 billion. But less than a quarter of prisoners leave prison into some form of employment. Evidence shows that additional support is more likely to help ex-prisoners.
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This briefing is designed to raise awareness about personality disorder, to dispel some myths, and to provide some information about this important and hotly disputed area.
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