Criminal justice

The majority of prisoners have mental health problems, often two or more at the same time. Imprisonment doesn't seem to reduce re-offending and it costs a great deal. We're finding more ways to fix this by developing liaison and diversion services, advocating community sentences, improving youth justice and unlocking secure care.

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Keys to Diversion finds that the most successful liaison and diversion teams offer support for a wide range of a person’s needs, connect with local agencies and stay in touch with people after they have been referred on.
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The briefing finds that community groups are key to engaging BME groups that are disproportionately represented both in mental health and criminal justice systems.
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The MHTR has unfulfilled potential to offer offenders with mental health problems the option of a sentence in the community.
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This briefing summarises the ways in which health and probation services can work together to meet the needs of offenders with mental health problems.
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This briefing paper presents a compelling argument for relevant agencies in housing, health and criminal justice to work together to ensure investment in the most effective and cost-effective interventions.
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This briefing examines the provision of mental health care for adults in the criminal justice system, what has been achieved to date and identifies priorities for further work.
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This report examines how pathways into and through secure mental health services can be improved to ensure a better flow between prison and secure services.
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Diversion shows diversion from custody is still much cheaper than just a few weeks in prison. Well-designed diversion schemes can help to reduce reoffending by one third.
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Only a small proportion of prisoners in England have jobs to go to on release and employment support is too often denied to offenders with mental health problems.
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Under the Radar calls for better diversion from custodial sentences for women with a personality disorder and increased training for prison staff.
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