The Individual Placement and Support Fidelity Scale is an excellent tool for:

  • designing an Individual Placement and Support service
  • determining the extent to which an existing employment service is an IPS service
  • identifying the potential causes of a poorly performing employment service

You can use the IPS Fidelity Scale to self-assess your service. Self-assessment is a good start for establishing which areas you need to improve on to become an IPS service. If you are scoring good to high fidelity you may want to consider an Independent Fidelity Review to confirm your scoring with the possibility of being invited to become an IPS Centre of Excellence. An Independent Fidelity Review assures Trusts, Providers and Commissioners of the effectiveness of your organisation and delivery of IPS.

The Fidelity Scale is the translation of the 8 principles into 25 items that a service can be scored against. The higher the score, the greater the quality of the IPS service and the higher the expected job outcomes.

Self assess your employment service

Below is the UK version of the IPS fidelity scale in it's entirety. Please feel free to use it to self-assess your service. Or you can download the form.

Download the Centre's fidelity scale template for the UK (931 KB)

For each item score your service 1-5; you can achieve a maximum of 125 points. Base your scoring on the actual evidence you have, not on what you would like to do, or what you plan to do in the future.

1. Caseload size

Employment specialists have individual employment caseloads. The maximum active caseload for any full-time employment specialist is 20 or fewer active clients (both job search and in-work support clients).

 1   Ratio of 41 or more clients per employment specialist.
 2   Ratio of 31-40 clients per employment specialist.
 3   Ratio of 26-30 clients per employment specialist.
 4   Ratio of 21-25 clients per employment specialist.
 5   Ratio of 20 or fewer clients per employment specialist.

2. Employment services staff

Employment specialists provide only employment services and do not provide mental health case management services. However, employment specialists may also assist clients to solve a range of employment related personal problems that may be barriers to employment.

 1   Employment specialists provide employment services less than 60% of the time.
 2   Employment specialists provide employment services 60 – 74% of the time.
 3   Employment specialists provide employment services 75 - 89% of the time.
 4   Employment specialists provide employment services 90 – 95% of the time.
 5   Employment specialists provide employment services 96% of the time.

3. Vocational generalists

Each employment specialist carries out all phases of employment service, including intake, engagement, assessment, job placement, job coaching, and follow-along support before step down to less intensive employment support from another MH practitioner and/or peer support. Note: It is not expected that each employment specialist will provide benefits counselling to their clients. Referrals to a highly trained benefits counsellor are in keeping with high fidelity (see Item 12).

 1   Employment specialist only provides vocational referral service to vendors and other programmes.
 2   Employment specialist maintains caseload but refers clients to other programmes for vocational services.
 3   Employment specialist provides one to four phases of the employment service (e.g. intake, engagement, assessment, job development, job placement, job coaching, and following along supports).
 4   Employment specialist provides five phases of employment service but not the entire service.
 5   Employment specialist carries out all six phases of employment service (e.g. programme intake, engagement, assessment, job development/job placement, job coaching, and follow-along support).

4. Integration of supported employment with mental health treatment through team assignment

Employment specialists are part of up to 2 mental health treatment teams from which at least 90% of the employment specialist’s caseload is comprised.

 1   Employment specialists are part of a vocational programme that functions separately from the mental health treatment.
 2   Employment specialists are attached to three of more mental health treatment teams.
OR Clients are served by individual mental health practitioners who are not organized into teams
OR Employment specialists are attached to one or two teams from which less than 50% off the employment specialist’s caseload is comprised.
 3   Employment specialists are attached to one or two mental health treatment teams, from which at least 50–74% of the employment specialist’s caseload is comprised.
 4   Employment specialists are attached to one or two mental health treatment teams, from which at least 75 – 89% of the employment specialist’s caseload is comprised.
 5   Employment specialists are attached to one or two mental health treatment teams, from which at least 90 – 100% of the employment specialist’s caseload is comprised.

5. Integration of supported employment with mental health treatment through frequent team member contact

Employment specialists actively participate in weekly “client focused” meetings with the mental health treatment team, (not replaced by administrative meetings), that discuss individual clients and their employment goals with shared decision-making. Employment specialist’s office is in close proximity to (or shared with) their mental health treatment team members. Documentation of mental health treatment and employment services is integrated in a single client record. Employment specialists help the team think about employment for people who haven’t yet been referred to supported employment services.

Of these five key components, state how many are present in your service:

  • Employment specialist attends weekly client focused meetings with the mental health treatment team.
  • Employment specialist participates actively in the team meetings with shared decision-making.
  • Employment services documentation (vocational assessment/profile, employment plan, progress notes) is integrated into the client’s mental health record.
  • Employment specialist’s office is in close proximity to (or shared with) the mental health team members.
  • Employment specialist helps the team think about employment for people who haven’t yet been referred to supported employment services.
 1   One or none is present
 2   Two are present
 3   Three are present
 4   Four are present
 5   Five are present

6. Collaboration between employment specialists and key staff members in Government DWP programmes and their contractors.

Liaison is important to promote sufficient referrals and to obtain assistance with Benefits and other return to work assistance. For instance in the UK this will be JobCentre Plus and Work Programme/Work Choice Providers. The employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have frequent contact for the purposes of identifying potential referrals, discussing shared clients, and obtaining additional assistance.

 1   Employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have client-related contacts (phone, e-mail, in person) less than quarterly to discuss shared clients and referrals. OR Employment specialists and related programme staff do not communicate.
 2   Employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have client-related contacts (phone, e-mail, in person) at least quarterly to discuss shared clients and referrals.
 3   Employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have client-related contacts (phone, e-mail, in person) monthly to discuss shared clients and referrals.
 4   Employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have scheduled, face-to-face meetings at least quarterly, OR have client-related contacts (phone, e-mail, in person) weekly to discuss shared clients and referrals.
 5   Employment specialists and Government funded programme staff have scheduled, face-to-face meetings at least monthly and have client-related contacts (phone, e-mail, in person) weekly to discuss shared clients and referrals.

7. Vocational unit

At least 2 full-time employment specialists and a team leader comprise the employment unit. They have weekly client-based group supervision following the supported employment model in which strategies are identified and job leads are shared. They provide coverage for each other’s caseload when needed.

 1   Employment specialists are not part of a vocational unit.
 2   Employment specialists have the same supervisor but do not meet as a group. They do not provide back-up services for each other’s caseload.
 3   Employment specialists have the same supervisor and discuss clients between each other on a weekly basis. They provide back-up services for each other’s caseloads as needed
OR
If a supported employment service is in a rural area where employment specialists are geographically separate with one employment specialist at each site, the employment specialists meet 2-3 times monthly with their supervisor by teleconference.
 4   At least 2 employment specialists and a team leader form an employment unit with 2-3 regularly scheduled meetings per month for client-based group supervision in which strategies are identified and job leads are shared and clients discussed between each other. They provide coverage for each other’s caseloads when needed
OR If a supported employment service is in a rural area where employment specialists are geographically separate with one employment specialist at each site, the employment specialists meet 2-3 times per month with their supervisor in person or by teleconference and mental health practitioners are available to help the employment specialist with activities such as taking someone to work or picking up job applications.
 5   At least 2 full-time employment specialists and a team leader form an employment unit with weekly client-based group supervision based on the supported employment model in which strategies are identified and job leads are shared. They provide coverage for each other’s caseloads when needed.

8. Role of employment supervisor

Supported employment unit is led by a supported employment team leader. Employment specialists’ skills are developed and improved through outcome-based supervision. All five key roles of the employment supervisor are present.

Five key roles of the employment supervisor

  • One full-time equivalent (FTE) supervisor is responsible for no more than 10 employment specialists. The supervisor does not have other supervisory responsibilities. (Supported Employment leaders supervising fewer than ten employment specialists, may spend a percentage of time on other supervisory activities on a prorated basis. For example, an employment supervisor responsible for 4 employment specialists may be devoted to SE supervision half time).
  • Supervisor conducts weekly supported employment supervision designed to review client situations and identify new strategies and ideas to help clients in their work lives.
  • Supervisor communicates with mental health treatment team leaders to ensure that services are integrated, to problem solve programmatic issues (such as referral process, or transfer of follow- along to mental health workers) and to be a champion for the value of work. Attends a meeting for each mental health treatment team on a quarterly basis.
  • Supervisor accompanies employment specialists, who are new or having difficulty with job development, in the field monthly to improve skills by observing, modelling, and giving feedback on skills, e.g., meeting employers for job development.
  • Supervisor reviews current client outcomes with employment specialists and sets goals to improve the Supported Employment Service performance at least quarterly.
 1   One or none is present
 2   Two are present
 3   Three are present
 4   Four are present
 5   Five are present

9. Zero exclusion criteria

All clients interested in working have access to supported employment services, regardless of job readiness factors, substance abuse, symptoms, history of violent behaviour, cognitive impairments, treatment non- adherence, and personal presentation. These apply during supported employment services too. Employment specialists offer to help with another job when one has ended, regardless of the reason that the job ended or number of jobs held. Clients are not screened out formally or informally. See the Fidelity Review Manual for how to score this item when the employment specialist caseload is full and no places are currently available.

 1   There is a formal policy to exclude clients due to lack of job readiness (e.g., substance abuse, history of violence, low level of functioning, etc.) by employment staff, case managers, or other practitioners.
 2 Most clients are unable to access supported employment services due to perceived lack of job readiness (e.g., substance abuse, history of violence, low level of functioning, etc.).
 3 Some clients are unable to access supported employment services due to perceived lack of job readiness (e.g., substance abuse, history of violence, low level of functioning, etc.).
 4 No evidence of exclusion, formal or informal. Referrals are not solicited by a wide variety of sources. Employment specialists offer to help with another job when one has ended, regardless of the reason that the job ended or number of jobs held.
 5 All clients interested in working have access to supported employment services. Mental health practitioners encourage clients to consider employment, and referrals for supported employment are solicited by many sources. Employment specialists offer to help with another job when one has ended, regardless of the reason that the job ended or number of jobs held.

10. The Mental Health Trust demonstrates a focus on competitive employment

The NHS Trust promotes competitive work through multiple strategies. The NHS Trust initial assessment, includes questions about interest in employment. The NHS Trust displays written postings (e.g., brochures, bulletin boards, posters) about employment and supported employment services. The focus should be with the Trust services for adults with severe mental illness. The Trust supports ways for clients to share work stories with other clients and staff. The Trust measures rate of competitive employment and shares this information with Trust leadership and staff.

Trust promotes competitive work through multiple strategies:

  • Trust intake includes questions about interest in employment.
  • Trust includes questions about interest in employment on all annual (or semi-annual assessment or treatment plan reviews.
  • Trust displays written postings (e.g., brochures, bulletin boards, posters) about working and supported employment services, in lobby and other waiting areas.
  • Trust supports ways for clients to share work stories with other clients and staff (e.g., Trust-wide employment recognition events, in-service training, peer support groups, Trust newsletter articles, invited speakers at client treatment groups, etc.) at least twice a year.
  • Trust measures rate of competitive employment on at least a quarterly basis and shares outcomes with Trust leadership and staff.
 1   One or none is present
 2   Two are present
 3   Three are present
 4   Four are present
 5   Five are present

11. Executive team support for supported employment

NHS Trust executive team members (e.g., CEO/Executive Director, Chief Operating Officer, QA Director, Chief Financial Officer, Clinical Director, Medical Director, Human Resource Director) assist with supported employment implementation and sustainability. All five key components of executive team support must be present for a score of 5.

  • Executive Director and Clinical Director demonstrate knowledge regarding the principles of evidence-based supported employment
  • Trust quality assurance process includes an explicit review of the SE programme, or components of the programme, at least every 6 months through the use of the Supported Employment Fidelity Scale or until achieving high fidelity, and at least yearly thereafter. Trust quality assurance process uses the results of the fidelity assessment to improve SE implementation and sustainability.
  • At least one member of the executive team actively participates at SE leadership team meetings (steering committee meetings) that occur at least every six months for high fidelity programmes and at least quarterly for programmes that have not yet achieved high fidelity. Steering committee is defined as a diverse group of stakeholders charged with reviewing fidelity, programme implementation and the service delivery system. Committee develops written action plans aimed at developing or sustaining high fidelity services.
  • The Trust CEO/Executive Director communicates how SE services support the mission of the Trust and articulates clear and specific goals for SE and/or competitive employment to all Trust staff during the first six months and at least annually (i.e., SE kickoff, all-Trust meetings, Trust newsletters, etc.)This item is not delegated to another administrator.
  • The IPS service leader shares information about IPS Evidence Based Barriers (difficulties) and Facilitators (successes) with the Trust Executive Team (including the CEO) at least twice each year. The Executive Team helps the service leader identify and implement solutions to barriers.

 1   One or none is present
 2   Two are present
 3   Three are present
 4   Four are present
 5   Five are present

12. Work incentives planning

All clients are offered assistance in obtaining comprehensive individualised work incentives planning before starting a new job and assistance accessing work incentives planning thereafter when making decisions about changes in work hours and pay. Work incentives planning includes the impact on all sources of income and fringe benefits (Personal independence payments, travel concession, DLA, Working Tax Credits, Universal Credit etc..) and all costs associated with commencing or changing employment. Clients are provided information and assistance about reporting earnings to any other programme that needs to know the new income details (e.g. Housing, Council Tax, HMRC etc).

 1   Work incentives planning is not readily available or easily accessible to most clients served by the IPS service.
 2 Employment specialist gives client contact information about where to access information about work incentives planning.
 3 Employment specialist discusses with each client changes in benefits based on work status.
 4 Employment specialist or other MH practitioner offers clients assistance in obtaining comprehensive, individualized work incentives planning by a person trained in work incentives planning prior to client starting a job.
 5 Employment specialist or other MH practitioner offer clients assistance in obtaining comprehensive, individualized work incentives planning by a specially trained work incentives planner prior to starting a job. They also facilitate access to work incentives planning when clients need to make decisions about changes in work hours and pay. Clients are provided information and assistance about reporting earnings to DWP, housing programmes, etc, depending on the person’s benefits.

13. Disclosure

Employment specialists provide clients with accurate information and assist with evaluating their choices to make an informed decision regarding what is revealed to the employer about having a disability.

  • Employment specialists do not require all clients to disclose their psychiatric disability at the work site in order to receive services.
  • Employment specialists offer to discuss with clients the possible costs and benefits (pros and cons) of disclosure at the work site in advance of clients disclosing at the work site. Employment specialists describe how disclosure relates to requesting accommodations and the employment specialist’s role communicating with the employer.
  • Employment specialists discuss specific information to be disclosed (e.g., disclose receiving mental health treatment, or presence of a psychiatric disability, or difficulty with anxiety, or unemployed for a period of time, etc.) and offers examples of what could be said to employers.
  • Employment specialists discuss disclosure on more than one occasion (e.g., if clients have not found employment after two months or if clients report difficulties on the job.)
 1   None is present
 2   One is present
 3   Two are present
 4   Three are present
 5   Four are present

14. Ongoing, work-based vocational assessment

Initial vocational assessment occurs over 2-3 sessions and is updated with information from work experiences in competitive jobs. A vocational profile form that includes information about preferences, experiences, skills, current adjustment, strengths, personal contacts, etc., is upgraded with each new job experience. Aims at problem solving using environmental assessments and consideration of reasonable accommodations. Sources of information include the client, treatment team, clinical records and with the client’s permission, information from family members and previous employers.

 1   Vocational evaluation is conducted prior to job placement with emphasis on office-based assessments, standardized tests, intelligence tests, work samples.
 2   Vocational assessment may occur through a stepwise approach that includes: prevocational work experiences (e.g., work units in a day programme), volunteer jobs, or set aside jobs (e.g.,Trust-run businesses, sheltered workshop jobs, affirmative businesses, enclaves).
 3  Employment specialists assist clients in finding competitive jobs directly without systematically reviewing interests, experiences, strengths etc. and do not routinely analyse job loss (or job problems) for lessons learned.
 4 Initial vocational assessment occurs over 2-3 sessions in which interests and strengths are explored. Employment specialists help clients learn from each job experience and also work with the treatment team to analyse job loss, job problems and job successes. They do not document these lessons learned in the vocational profile, 
OR 
The vocational profile is not updated on a regular basis.
 5 Initial vocational assessment occurs over 2-3 sessions and information is documented on a vocational profile form that includes preferences, experiences, skills, current adjustment, strengths, personal contacts, etc. The vocational profile form is used to identify job types and work environments. It is updated with each new job experience. Aims at problem solving using environmental assessments and consideration of reasonable accommodations. Sources of information include the client, treatment team, clinical records, and with the client’s permission, from family members and previous employers. Employment specialists help clients learn from each job experience and also work with the treatment team to analyse job loss, job problems and job successes.

15. Rapid job search for competitive job

Initial employment assessment and first face- to-face employer contact by the client or the employment specialist about a competitive job occurs within 30 days (one month) after programme entry.

 1   First face-to-face contact with an employer by the client of the employment specialist about a competitive job is on average 271 days or more (>9months) after programme entry.
 2 First face-to-face contact with an employer by the client or the employment specialist about a competitive job is on average 151 and 270 days (5-9 months) after programme entry.
 3 First face-to-face contact with an employer by the client or the employment specialist about a competitive job is on average between 61 and 150 days (2-5 months) after a programme entry.
 4 First face to face contact with an employer by the client or the employment specialist about a competitive job is on average between 31 and 60 days (1-2 months) after programme entry.
 5 The programme tracks employer contacts and the first face-to-face contact with an employer by the client or the employment specialist about a competitive job is on average within 30 days (one month) after programme entry.

16. Individualised job search

Employment specialists make employer contacts aimed at making a good job match based on client’s preferences (relating to what each person enjoys and their personal goals) and needs (including experience, ability, symptoms, health, etc) rather than the job market (i.e., those jobs that are readily available). An individualised job search plan is developed and updated with information from the vocational assessment/profile form and new job/educational experiences.

 1   Less than 25% of employer contacts by the employment specialist are based on job choices which reflect client’s preferences, strengths, symptoms, etc. rather than the job market.
 2 25-49% of employer contacts by the employment specialist are based on job choices which reflect client’s preferences, strengths, symptoms, etc. rather than the job marked.
 3 50-74% of employer contacts by the employment specialist are based on job choices which reflect client’s preferences, strengths, symptoms, etc., rather than the job market.
 4 75-89% of employer contacts by the employment specialist are based on job choices which reflect client’s preferences, strengths, symptoms, etc., rather than the job market and are consistent with the current employment plan.
 5 Employment specialists makes employer contacts based on job choices which reflect client’s preferences, strengths, symptoms, lessons learned from previous jobs etc., 90-100% of the time rather than the job market and are consistent with the current employment/job search plan. When clients have limited work experience, employment specialists provide information about a range of job options in the community.

17. Job development - Frequent employer contact

Each employment specialist makes at least 6 face-to-face employer contacts per week on behalf of clients looking for work. (Rate for each week then calculate average and use the closest scale point). An employer contact is counted even when an employment specialist meets the same employer more than one time in a week, and when the client is present or not present. Client-specific and generic contacts are included. Employment specialists use a weekly tracking form to document employer contacts.

 1   Employment specialist makes less than 2 face-to-face employer contacts that are client- specific per week.
 2 Employment specialist makes 2 face-to-face employer contacts per week that are client- specific,
OR Does not have a process for tracking.
 3 Employment specialist makes 4 face-to-face employer contacts per week that are client- specific, and uses a tracking form that is reviewed by the SE supervisor on a monthly basis.
 4 Employment specialist makes 5 face-to-face employer contacts per week that are client- specific, and uses a tracking form that is reviewed by the SE supervisor on a weekly basis.
 5 Employment specialist makes 6 or more face-to-face employer contacts per week that are client specific, or 2 employer contacts times the number of people looking for work when there are less than 3 people looking for work on their caseload (e.g., new programme). In addition, employment specialist keeps records that can be reviewed by a supervisor on a weekly basis.

18. Job development - Quality of employer contact

Employment specialists build relationships with employers through multiple visits in person that are planned to learn the needs of the employer, convey what the Supported Employment programme offers to the employer, describe client strengths that are a good match for the employer (Rate for each employment specialist, then calculate average and use the closest scale point).

 1   Employment specialist meets employer when helping client to turn in job applications, 
OR
Employment specialist rarely makes employer contacts.
 2 Employment specialists contacts employer to ask about job openings and then shares these “leads” with clients.
 3 Employment specialist follows up on advertised job openings by introducing self, describing programme, and asking employer to interview client.
 4 Employment specialist meets with employers in person whether or not there is a job opening, advocates for clients by describing strengths and asks employers to interview clients.
 5 Employment specialist builds relationships with employers through multiple visits in person that are planned to learn the needs of the employer, convey what the SE programme offers to the employer, describe client strengths that are a good match for the employer.

19. Diversity of job types

Employment specialists assist clients in obtaining different types of jobs.

 1   Employment specialists assist clients to obtain different types of jobs less than 50% of the time.
 2 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain different types of jobs 50-59% of the time.
 3 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain different types of jobs 60-69% of the time.
 4 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain different types of jobs 70-84% of the time.
 5 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain different types of jobs 85-100% of the time.

20. Diversity of employers

Employment specialists assist clients in obtaining jobs with different employers.

 1   Employment specialists assist clients to obtain jobs with different employers less than 50% of the time.
 2 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain jobs with the same employers 50-59% of the time.
 3 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain jobs with different employers 60-69% of the time.
 4 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain jobs with different employers 70-84% of the time.
 5 Employment specialists assist clients to obtain jobs with different employers 85-100% of the time.

21. Competitive jobs

Employment specialists provide competitive job options that have permanent status rather than temporary or time-limited status, e.g. transitional employment positions. Competitive jobs pay at least the minimum wage, are jobs that anyone can apply for and are not set aside for people with disabilities. (Seasonal jobs and jobs from temporary agencies that other community members use are counted as competitive jobs)

 1   Employment specialists provide options for permanent, competitive jobs less than 64% of the time
OR There are fewer than 10 current jobs.
 2 Employment specialists provide options for permanent, competitive jobs about 65-74% of the time.
 3 Employment specialists provide options for permanent competitive jobs about 75-84% of the time.
 4 Employment specialists provide options for permanent competitive jobs about 85-94% of the time.
 5 95% or more competitive jobs held by clients are permanent.

22. Individualized follow-along support

Clients receive different types of in-work support that are based on the job, client preferences, work history, needs, etc. Supports are provided by a variety of people, including treatment team members (e.g., medication changes, social skills training, encouragement), family, friends, co- workers (i.e., natural supports), and employment specialist. Employment specialist also provides employer support (e.g., educational information, job accommodations) at client’s request. Employment specialist offers help with career development, i.e., assistance with education, a more desirable job, or more preferred job duties.

 1   Most clients do not receive supports after starting a job.
 2 About half of the working clients receive a narrow range of supports provided primarily by the employment specialist.
 3 Most working clients receive a narrow range of supports that are provided primarily by the employment specialist.
 4 Clients receive different types of support for working a job that are based on the job, client preferences, work history, needs, etc. Employment specialists provide employer supports at the client’s request.
 5 Clients receive different types of support for working a job that are based on the job, client preferences, work history, needs, etc. Employment specialist also provides employer support (e.g., educational information, job accommodations) at client’s request. The employment specialist helps people move onto more preferable jobs and also helps people with education or certified training programmes. The site provides examples of different types of support including enhanced supports by treatment team members.

23. Time-unlimited follow-along supports

Employment specialists have face-to-face contact within 1 week before starting a job, within 3 days after starting a job, weekly for the first month, and at least monthly for a year or more, on average, after working steadily and as desired by clients. Clients are transitioned to step down job supports from a mental health worker following steady employment. Employment specialists contact clients within 3 days of learning about the job loss.

 1   Employment specialist does not meet face-to-face with the client after the first month of starting a job.
 2 Employment specialist has face-to-face contact with less than half of the working clients for at least 4 months after starting a job.
 3 Employment specialist has face-to-face contact with at least half of the working clients for at least 4 months after starting a job.
 4 Employment specialist has face-to-face contact with working clients weekly for the first month after starting a job, and at least monthly for a year or more, on average, after working steadily, and as desired by clients.
 5 Employment specialist has face-to-face contact within 1 week before starting a job, within 3 days after starting a job, weekly for the first month, and at least monthly for a year or more, on average, after working steadily and as desired by clients. Clients may be transitioned to intermittent support, or regular monitoring, following steady employment. Employment specialist contacts clients within 3 days of hearing about the job loss.

24. Community-based services

Employment services such as client engagement, job finding and follow-along supports are provided in natural community settings by all employment specialists. (Rate each employment specialist based upon their total weekly scheduled work hours, then calculate the average and use the closest scale point).

 1   Employment specialist spends 30% time or less in the scheduled work hours in the community.
 2 Employment specialist spends 30-39% time of total scheduled work hours in the community.
 3 Employment specialist spends 40-49% of total scheduled work hours in the community.
 4 Employment specialist spends 50-64 % of total scheduled work hours in the community.
 5 Employment specialist spends 65% or more of total scheduled work hours in the community.

25. Assertive engagement and outreach by integrated treatment team

Service termination is not based on missed appointments or fixed time limits. There is systematic documentation of outreach attempts. Engagement and outreach attempts are made by integrated team members. Multiple home/community visits. Coordinated visits by employment specialist with integrated team member. Connect with family, when applicable. Once it is clear that the client no longer wants to work or continue SE services, the team stops outreach.

  • Service termination is not based on missed appointments or fixed time limits.
  • Systematic documentation of outreach attempts.
  • Engagement and outreach attempts made by integrated team members.
  • Multiple home/community visits.
  • Coordinated visits by employment specialist with integrated team member.
  • Connect with family, when applicable.
 1   Evidence that 2 or fewer strategies for engagement and outreach are used.
 2 Evidence that 3 strategies for engagement and outreach are used.
 3 Evidence that 4 strategies for engagement and outreach are used.
 4 Evidence that 5 strategies for engagement and outreach are used.
 5 Evidence that all 6 strategies for engagement and outreach are used.

Your scoring

Add up your marks and see how well your service adheres to the IPS Fidelity Scale.

115-125 Exemplary IPS Fidelity
100-114 Good IPS Fidelity
74-99 Fair IPS Fidelity
73 and below Not supported employment

Next Steps

Assessing your service regularly and producing and reviewing action plans is an excellent means to continuously improve your service.
Prepare an Action Plan to improve your service's scoring and review progress regularly by repeating the self-assessment

Independent IPS Fidelity Reviews

Many commissioners now ask that employment support organisations, who claim to be an IPS service, have an independent IPS Fidelity Review to assure the quality of their service.

Centre for Mental Health and its associates have carried out over 40 independent fidelity reviews across the UK and are therefore able to benchmark new services against the best in the UK. This gives assurance to providers and commissioners of the effectiveness of the organisation and delivery of IPS. During an independent Fidelity Review, your reviewer will examine the documented evidence you have and will interview clinicians, service users, employment specialists, team leaders and executives to substantiate your scoring. Click here to look at example video clips of Fidelity Review interviews

Employment services that achieve a good or exemplary IPS Fidelity Score may be invited to be an IPS Centre of Excellence.

For more information please contact:

Nicola Oliver
Tel: 020 7827 8312
Email: nicola.oliver@centreformentalhealth.org.uk