“Poor mental wellbeing affects far more than one in four of us during our lives, and particularly those who are poorest and most excluded,” Centre for Mental Health chief executive Sarah Hughes said today.

Responding to research published today by the Mental Health Foundation and NatCen, Surviving or Thriving?, Sarah Hughes said: “Nearly two-thirds of us have experienced a mental health problem during our lives according to today’s report, rising to some 85% of people who are out of work. Younger people and those who live alone are also more likely to say they have experienced poor mental health.

Nearly two-thirds of us have experienced a mental health problem during our lives, rising to some 85% of people who are out of work.

“This report is a timely reminder that good mental health is fundamental to our wellbeing and that social inequalities strongly influence our chances of having mental health difficulties.

“We support the report’s call for a greater focus on mental wellbeing, for action to promote mental health literacy and community resilience, and for more investment in vital mental health research.

Social inequalities strongly influence our chances of having mental health difficulties

“We need to support local authorities to invest in public mental health and suicide prevention. We need to support people with mental health problems with employment, housing and debt. And we need to address some of the biggest and most entrenched health and social inequalities in communities across the UK.


Learn what we're doing across employment, housing, suicide prevention and changing policy, until people with mental health problems have a fair chance in life.